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Posted on Apr 4, 2004 in Stuff We Like

Duxford Air Museum: A Photo Visit

Armchair General

HANGAR 2

Although there are not so many exhibits in Hangar 2, this is for a reason – most of them are fully operational, flyable planes. However although this means the exhibits are less cramped together than in Hangar 1, it also means that you are unable to get close to all of them. Toolboxes are strewn everywhere and the sweet smell of lubricating oil fills the air when you enter this heated hangar. Along with the constant thrumming noise of the air conditioning units, this all made us feel a little like we were below decks aboard a gigantic aircraft carrier.

Displayed in this hall you will see a Kittyhawk III, a Bristol Fighter F2B biplane – one of the first fighter planes used by the British in World War I and a Hawker Nimrod. There is also a Mk14 Spitfire, which was there on the day, but right at the back in the shadows. Having said this, if anyone would like us to E-mail them a really dark picture of a half-obscured Spitfire with a five-bladed propeller, please let us know.

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This is a Grumman Wildcat FM2, with some work being carried out to the radial engine. Photo by AJS.

This is another Grumman model, an F7F Tigercat of the type that entered service one day before the end of the Second World War. There’s Roach in the foreground. Photo by AJS.

Here is a P-47 Thunderbolt ready to go. Photo by AJS.

This is what’s left of a German Heinkel HE111, except this particular plane was made under license and flown by the Spanish Air Force. Photo by AJS.

Here is a lovely shot of a B17G Flying Fortress. Photo by Roach.

Another shot of the Sally –B, one of the stars of the film Memphis Belle and currently masquerading as that famous aircraft. Photo by AJS.

And finally, here is a Spitfire. Unfortunately, there was no information panel next to this one, so we aren’t quite sure which model it is. We think it’s a Mk IX but we are open to correction. Photo by AJS.

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